SUBJECT : Webinar Report Webinar Report on Treasure from Trash Workshop-18th December, 2021 

 

TREASURE FROM TRASH WORKSHOP

Theme: Innovation with E-Waste

Date: 18th December 2021 (Saturday)

Session Report

SPA ENVIS RP on Human Settlements and Their Impact on Environment 

Hosted by School of Planning and Architecture

Electronic waste or commonly entitled as E-waste is categorized by the end of life electronic or electrical equipment, discarded by the consumer for the purposes of dismantling and recycling or abandoning in environment. Faster obsolescence and frequent up gradation of electronic products, pushes the consumer sector to replace the old products for better technology, causing subsequent additions of e-waste to landfills. In India the e-waste is increasing at the rate of 10% and is considered the fastest growing steam of waste that requires immediate, effective and adequate legislative measures and cost effective, environmentally sustainable technologies.   

Cellphones, laptops, washing machines, refrigerators, air conditioners, vacuum cleaners, CDs, televisions, computers etc., when discarded as e-waste in bulk contains substantial amount of metals, plastics, glass and chemicals that are hazardous to environment and its biotic component. The Environmental and health challenges imposed by inappropriate handling and management of e-waste and selling to unauthorized recycler were the key reasons for the introduction of E-waste (Management and Handling) Rules in 2011 in India. These Rules came into effect from 1 May 2012 but was not effective due to shortcomings on multiple fronts. With subsequent amendments to address the shortcomings, in 1998 the Rule confirms the effective management of e-waste and has operated extended producer responsibilities in handling the waste.

Approx. 3.2 million metric tonnes (mMT) of e-waste was generated in India in 2019 as surveyed by Global E-waste Monitor, 2020 (Source: E-WASTE MANAGEMENT IN INDIA, Challenges and Agenda, CSE). Data analysis reflected the yearly growth in e-waste is approximately 13%. To tackle this menace numeral of e-waste generation, the reduction at sources through sensitization and awareness towards producer and consumer responsibilities can halt the detrimental effects on Human and Natural Resources.

Approx. 3.2 million metric tonnes (mMT) of e-waste was generated in India in 2019 as surveyed by Global E-waste Monitor, 2020 (Source: E-WASTE MANAGEMENT IN INDIA, Challenges and Agenda, CSE). Data analysis reflected the yearly growth in e-waste is approximately 13%. To tackle this menace numeral of e-waste generation, the reduction at sources through sensitization and awareness towards producer and consumer responsibilities can halt the detrimental effects on Human and Natural Resources.

In this context, ENVIS Resource Partner (RP) on Human Settlements and their impact on Environment took a minuscule initiative to educate the youths towards the potential of e-waste hazards through enjoyable artwork. The Treasure from Trash Online Workshop with theme on ‘Innovation with E-waste’ was conducted by ENVIS RP, School of Planning and Architecture on 18th Dec 2021 (Saturday, 4:00 pm to 5:00 pm) in support of Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change. This workshop is envisioned to procure the productive involvement of young generation and tapping innate abilities in recreating a world to live and breathe. The craft and creativity taught in the session can be considered as an anonymous recycling process to halt the unnecessary dumping of e-waste in landfills. The workshop was attended by 35 students from different schools of India and Australia.  

Dr Marisha Sharma, Environmental Consultant by profession is also a recycling artist who demonstrated the recycling craft from waste CDs or DVDs in this session of Treasure from Trash. She is a Civil Engineer with a Masters in Environmental Planning and a PhD from IIT, Delhi. She is also a visiting faculty to School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi.  Her unique hobby of converting any wastes like CDs, newspaper, tile old cloth, old bottles, pieces of old jewelry or junk into artifacts with a uniqueness involves innovative techniques like Glass Planting, Shells Craft, Mandala Art and many more. Her hobbies also includes promoting scrabble amidst students, reading, painting and photography, with her photographs published by National Geographic and exhibited in international competitions.

The workshop was commenced with a small skit presented by Harsimran Kaur (Information Officer, SPA ENVIS RP) to sensitize the participants towards the detrimental impacts of e-waste on land and water resource caused by human interventions. Prof. Dr. Meenakshi Dhote, Head of the Department, Environmental Planning (School of Planning and Architecture) and Coordinator, SPA ENVIS RP spoke on the urgency to reuse or recycle the e-waste with appropriate authorized methods to save the environment and its resources.

Dr Marisha Sharma showcased her Recycle Artworks followed by hands on training in recycled crafts to skill the 27 participants with different techniques in creating e-waste craft and to enhance their creativity and talented minds. She used waste jute thread and wool, pistachio shells, waste ear buds, wrapping paper and paints for the decoration and demonstrated with the purpose of not to waste any waste.

During the online session each and every instruction was candidly followed by the children with alacrity in making the recycled craft. The recycled art craft made by Dr. Marisha and some of the participants during the session are shown below.

SPA ENVIS RP staff provided technical support and arrangements for making this event a grand success. The end of the session was felicitated with a vote of thanks and concluding remarks on the significance of effective management of e-waste by Prof. Dr. Meenakshi Dhote. She also stressed the on extended responsibilities of the producer and consumer in the process of reuse and recycling of e-waste.

SPA ENVIS RP staff provided technical support and arrangements for making this event a grand success. The end of the session was felicitated with a vote of thanks and concluding remarks on the significance of effective management of e-waste by Prof. Dr. Meenakshi Dhote. She also stressed the on extended responsibilities of the producer and consumer in the process of reuse and recycling of e-waste.

**